Talaria Enterprises: Oriental Asian Art Reproductions, Chinese, Japanese, Cambodian, Dragon, Fu Dog, Samurai Japanese Warrior with Sword
search our site


how can we help?
1-800-227-9196

Bookmark and Share








art by category

SCULPTURE
Mixed: Many!
Animals 1 / 2
Composers
Family
Garden Art
Gargoyles
Historic Figures
Philosophers
Lifesize

DESK
Bookends
Desk Art
Lamps
Mouse Pads
Themed Treasure Boxes

HOUSE DECOR
Greek Vases
Porcelain-Goebel
Scented Items
Kelvin Chen Teapots
Ornaments
Table Bases
Throws

WALL DECOR
Frescoes
Wall Hangings
Tapestries
Stained Glass
Paintings

WEARABLE
Handbags / Umbrellas
Watches
Jewelry
Scarfs & Ties

MORE
Games,Puzzles
Garden Art
Displaying Art
Sale / Clearance

3d-mouseion parastone bosch dali klimt rodin klimt

bonded marble from Italy

Goebel Porcelain Decor Collection

ancient_treasures

art by culture

EARLY
Ancient Goddesses
Egyptian
Mesopotamian
Minoan
Prehistoric

WESTERN COUNTRIES
American
Assorted
Art Deco
Art Nouveau
Baroque
Celtic
Christian/Catholic
Cycladic
Greek/Roman
Impressionism
Medieval
Modern
Neoclassicism
Renaissance
Surrealism

WORLD CULTURES
African
Asian/Oriental
Byzantine Icons
Hindu
Precolumbian
Tribal Societies

art by artist

Arcimboldo
Bernini
Bosch
Brancusi
Breugel
Canova
Mark Chagall
Salvador Dali
Edgar Degas
Walt Disney
Frank Lloyd Wright
Gustav Klimt
Edouard Manet
Michelangelo
Monet
Modigliani
Alphonse Mucha
Maxfield Parrish
Francois Pompon
Auguste Renoir
Auguste Rodin
Ronner-Knip
Louis Comfort Tiffany
Toulouse-Lautrec
Vincent Van Gogh

asian / oriental sculpture art
Page 1
Oriental Arts:
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7

Geisha in Green Robe by Eisen Ikeda
Geisha in Green Robe by Eisen Ikeda
The beauties, mostly courtesans, were realistically portrayed mostly with a surly expression. For example, they are more voluptuous and powerful than the well-known slim women of Kitagawa Utamaro, but have a unprecedented sensual appearance.
The kimonos, in which the women are wrapped up, are decorated in a fantastic and lavish manner. This goes especially for the obi, the wide waistbands. The expensive kimono was usually a gift from a satisfied well-to-do customer and was symbolic for the woman's successful career within Edo's famous quarters of easy virtue. Measures 4.5"L x 3.5"D x 8.25"H
EIS011-148
Geisha in Green Robe Japanese Statue by Eisen Ikeda, Parastone Collection

Geisha with Headband by Katsushika Hokusai
Geisha with Headband by Katsushika Hokusai
Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) belongs to the best-known, most innovative, and, with 30,000 designs, the most productive ukyio-e artists. Not until he was in his sixties, did he make his most famous works, among which are the Fagaku Sanjurokkei, 36 Views on the Fuji Mountains and Shokoky Taki Meguri, The Journey to the Waterfalls. The Gakyo-rojin, the mad painter- which he called himself - stayed productive well into his eighties. Apparently he said on his death bed: "If I would be granted another five years, I will become a genuine artist."

The "Two Beauties" (1803-1805) was originally made with ink and paint on silk. Measures 5"L x 4"D x 9"H HOK011-148
Geisha with Headband Japanese Statue by Hokusai


Geisha in White Floral Robe by Kaigetsudo Ando
Geisha in White Floral Robe by Kaigetsudo Ando
Kaigetsudo Ando (1671-1743) In many ways, the work of Kaigetsudo Ando determines the characteristics of future Japanese art of printing. Although he himself only made nikuhitsuga, original paintings, one recognizes the style of famous future artists, in the delineation and composition. Kaigetsudo Ando himself was considered to be the best known follower of Hishikawa Moronobu, the patriarch of the ukiyo-e. Kaigetsudo's successful career came to a sudden halt in 1714 because of the artist alleged involvement in a scandal at the courts of the shogun. One of the maids of honor, Ejima, had an affair with an attractive, young actor. When this came to light, the adulterous couple was banned from Edo, together with dozens of people from their entourage. This figurine represents a courtesan with long hair, beginning of 1700, painting on paper. Measures 4"L x 4"D x 8.5"H KAI011-148
Geisha in White Floral Robe Japanese Statue by Parastone

Samurai with Sword of 108 Heroes by Utagawa Kuniyoshi
Samurai with Sword of 108 Heroes by Utagawa Kuniyoshi
The 108 Heroes of the Popular Suikiden, All Tales. The Chinese legend from the 14th century takes place during the rule of the Song Dynasty (960-1125) and is an exciting and very bloody Robin Hood story: a group of rebels (some former criminals), live in the swampland near Liangsham mountain. Led by the brave Song Jian they fight against injustice and corrupt officials. Among themselves they have strict rules, are merciless during battle and above all they are faithful to the emperor. Gyokukirin Roshungi is a rich man from Peking and a well trained warrior. Through complicated intrigues, one of which a false prophecy, he becomes involved in the heroic battle. Measures 7"L x 4"D x 9"H KU011-184
Samurai with Sword of 108 Heroes by Utagawa Kuniyoshi

Samurai with Bow by Utagawa Kuniyoshi
Samurai with Bow by Utagawa Kuniyoshi
After a difficult start as an independent artist, Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797-1861), he got his break with his series "The 108 Heroes of the Suikoden", based on a popular Chinese tale from the 14th Century. He developed into the best known portraitist of heroes and warriors.

The Faithful Samurai (1847-1848)
The series Seishu Gishi Den, portraits of 47 Ronin, Samurai without a master, is based on a true heroic story: in 1701 Lord Asano van Ako was provoked by Kira, the arrogant chamberlain of the shogun. Asano lost self control and wounded Kira and was forced to kill himself according to ceremony. 47 faithful Samurai were intent on revenge for a year. Finally Kira's house was attacked and Kira was beheaded. All 47 Samurai were forced to commit suppuku. They died like heroes of the people and the blood-curdling story was played many times in the Kabuki theatre.

After his lord's death, Masa-aki settled as a doctor under a false name. He was already 62, but fought like a tiger during the attack of Kira's house. It made him into one of the most respected heroes. Measures 7"L x 5.5"D x 8"H KU021-184
Samurai with Bow by Utagawa Kuniyoshi


Samurai Standing with Sword in Hand
Samurai Standing with Sword in Hand
Chiba Mitsutada was a rough diamond type of man. Although he had become a Ronin earlier, he still decided to revenge the death of his former lord. Under a false name he trained warriors from home, especially in archery. Measures 5.5"L x 4.5"D x 9"H KU031-184
Samurai Standing with Sword in Hand Japanese Statue by Parastone

Samurai in Attack Form with Sword
Samurai in Attack Form with Sword
As Ronin, Yukukawa Sampei Munenori stayed at his uncle and aunt's for a year. He looked good, was intelligent and could have had a great future ahead of him. But he chose to revenge the death of his lord. He is portrayed hitting the lantern of the house of Kira. Measures 6.5"L x 4.5"D x 9"H KU041-184
Samurai in Attack Form with Sword Japanese Statue by Parastone

Kabuki with Spear by Kunisada Utagawa
Kabuki with Spear by Kunisada Utagawa
From the beginning of the 17th century, Kabuki was a prominent feature in the nightlife of the big cities. Initially the rebellious plays have a strong erotic atmosphere. However, in 1629 the leaders banished the women and later, from 1652 onwards, the young men were also banished from the stage. Because of this more room was created for the story itself.
The performance could last a full day, beginning with a heroic history play, followed by a dramatic, sometimes ironic play about daily life. Dramas about an impossible love, ending with a double suicide were very popular. There was a lot of contact between players and audience. A lot of shouting and stamping went on and the actors were spurred on loudly.

Ichikawa Kodanji IV (1856)
The Kabuki actors were national heroes, although they belonged to the hinin, the lowest class. They were considered as idols by the audience. Consequently, the portraits of the actors (which were also on sale at the theatre) sold out fast.

This Kabuki figurine, representing the actor, Ichikawa Kodanji IV and measures 6.5"L x 4.5"D x 10.5"H KUN011-184
Kabuki with Spear Japanese Statue by Kunisada Utagawa


Kabuki with Sword by Kunisada Utagawa
Kabuki with Sword by Kunisada Utagawa
During his lifetime Kunsinada Utagawa (1786-1865) was considered one of the greatest ukyio-e artists. As a son of a rich merchant from Edo, he learned his trade in the prominent Utagawa Toyokuni studios. After publication of his first portraits of Kabuki actors in 1808 his fame rose to great heights. Commercially he became the most successful wood block print artist ever.

Bando Kamezo
The Kabuki actors were national heroes, although they belonged to the hinin, the lowest class. They were considered as idols by the audience. Consequently, the portraits of the actors (which were also on sale at the theatre) sold out fast.

This Kabuki figurine, representing the actor, Bando Kamezo Measures 7"L x 4.5"D x 9"H KUN021-184
Kabuki with Sword Japanese Statue by Kunisada Utagawa


Samurai Japanese Archer
Samurai Japanese Archer
“Bushido” is the “Way of the Warrior.” Samurai were the Japanese Warrior Class, who served under their lord. They upheld a strict code of honor and without hesitation would commit suicide, “seppuku”, if requested by their lord or before they could be captured in battle. This battle-clad samurai archer is ready to deliver the enemy the arrow from his longbow. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted detailsm 10.5”H. 51731-149
View Larger Picture
Samurai Archer Kneeling Sculpture - Kyujutsu

Samurai Japanese Warrior with Sword
“Bushido” is the “Way of the Warrior.” Samurai were the Japanese Warrior Class, who served under their lord. They upheld a strict code of honor and without hesitation would commit suicide, “seppuku”, if requested by their lord or before they could be captured in battle. This samurai is dressed in war fatigue and is ready to deliver a death blow from his sword. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details, 9.5”H. 51741-157
View Larger Picture
Samurai Warrior Sword Overhead Japanese Sculpture
Samurai Japanese Warrior with Sword

Samurai Japanese in Kimono with Sword on Rock
Samurai Japanese in Kimono with Sword on Rock
Japanese Samurai in Kimono in his village -- but always poised for duty. “Bushido” is the “Way of the Warrior.” Samurai were the Japanese Warrior Class, who served under their lord. They upheld a strict code of honor and without hesitation would commit suicide, “seppuku”, if requested by their lord or before they could be captured in battle. This kimono-clad samurai warrior is away from his duty but ready to deliver the enemy the arrow from his longbow should he be called to defend his people. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details. It measures 9"H x 8.5"W.53011-150
View Larger Picture
Samurai on Rock in Kimono with Sword

Samurai Japanese General with Sword
A Fierce and Honorable Samurai General. “Bushido” is the “Way of the Warrior.” Samurai were the Japanese Warrior Class, who served under their lord. They upheld a strict code of honor and without hesitation would commit suicide, “seppuku”, if requested by their lord or before they could be captured in battle. This battle-clad samurai general (note his special headpiece like shaped like a U) is ready to deliver the enemy the arrow from his longbow. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details. It measures 10"H. 53001-149
View Larger Picture
Honorable Samurai Japanese General with Sword
Samurai Japanese General with Sword

Japanese Samurai with Spear
Japanese Samurai with Spear
“Bushido” is the “Way of the Warrior.” Samurai were the Japanese Warrior Class, who served under their lord. They upheld a strict code of honor and without hesitation would commit suicide, “seppuku”, if requested by their lord or before they could be captured in battle. This samurai warrior is ready to deliver the enemy his spear should he be called to defend his people. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details. It measures 9"H x 8.5"W. 53441-149
View Larger Picture
Samurai Warrior with Spear Japanese Sculpture

Japanese Samurai with Sword at Side
“Bushido” is the “Way of the Warrior.” Samurai were the Japanese Warrior Class, who served under their lord. They upheld a strict code of honor and without hesitation would commit suicide, “seppuku”, if requested by their lord or before they could be captured in battle. This samurai warrior is ready to deliver the enemy his sword should he be called to defend his people. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details. It measures 9"H x 8.5"W. 53451-149
View Larger Picture
Samurai Sword at Side Japanese Warrior Sculpture
Japanese Samurai with Sword at Side

Samurai Two Swords in Kimono - Bujutsu

Samurai Two Swords in Kimono - Bujutsu
The art of combat (‘bu’ means ‘military’ and ‘jutsu’ means ‘craft or method’) requires many hours of precise maneuvers and meditation. The Samurai pursues perfection in body, mind and spirit. Kenjutsu, a classification of Bujutsu, is the samurai’s sword art which originated some 1500 years and flourished in training schools (dojos) beginning in the 9th century AD. It has many substyles such as the: Mijin Style, emphasizing leaping and running attacks; Muto Style, fighting without the sword until a sword is available; Nito Style, using two swords to fight multiple attackers, made popular by Musashi Miyamoto (17th century); Suio Style, standing in water with blade submerged so the enemy sees a bent reflection and is unaware where the blade will strike. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details, 9”H x 7”W x 6.25”D. 55431-149
View Larger Picture
Samurai Two Swords in Kimono - Bujutsu

Samurai with Lantern and Sword in Kimono - Kenjutsu

Samurai with Lantern and Sword in Kimono - Kenjutsu
Like a poised tiger, the Samurai with his Katana (blade) waits patiently for his opponent to reveal his weakness; that is when the Samurai strikes. Kenjutsu is the samurai’s sword art which originated some 1500 years and flourished in training schools beginning in the 9th century AD. It has many substyles such as: Mijin Style, emphasizing leaping and running attacks; Muto Style, fighting without the sword until a sword is available; Nito Style, using two swords to fight multiple attackers, made popular by Musashi Miyamoto (17th century); Suio Style, standing in water with blade submerged so the enemy sees a bent reflection and is unaware where the blade will strike. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details, 8.75”H x 6.75”W x 4”D. 55421-149
View Larger Picture
Samurai with Lantern and Sword in Kimono - Kenjutsu

Samurai on Galloping Horse with Flag and Sword

Samurai on Galloping Horse with Flag and Sword
This mounted Samurai carries on his back a sashimono (flag) that bears the mon (family emblem) of the Ankokuji army. During the famous Battle of Sekigahara in the mid-1600, Ekei Ankokuji was on the side of Ishida Mitsunari against Tokugawa leyasu. The battle ended in favor of leyasu. Ankokuji and Mitsunari were both beheaded. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details, 10.5”H x 9.5”W x 3.5”D. 55441-151
View Larger Picture
Samurai on Horse with Flag and Sword Galloping


Samurai Mounted on Horse with Spear
By the middle of the Civil War era (Gempei wars, 1180-1185), the mochi-yari (spear) had replaced the bow as the mounted Samurai’s principal weapon. From horseback, the yari was normally used as an impaling weapon. If it failed to penetrate the enemy’s armor, it could also be used to knock him to the ground where he could be finished off with a sword. Made from cold cast bronze with hand painted details, 12.5”H x 7”W x 3”D. 55451-151
View Larger Picture
Samurai on Horse with Spear
Samurai Mounted on Horse with Spear

Frog Garden Seat Sculpture in Charcoal Granite Finish
Frog Garden Seat Sculpture in Charcoal Granite Finish
Make this beautifully stylized frog a wonderful addition to your home or garden. Let his flat head and swirling body patterns charm family members and guests for years to come. Made from museum resin in a charcoal granite finish and measures 16.75'' H x 15'' L. 61101-1277
Frog Garden Seat Sculpture, Grey Granite Finish

Home | My Account | Help Desk | About Us| FAQ | <SALE>z|z Fax Order Form z|z Policies z|z:
Newsletter: CurrentzorzPast Art Links | All merchandise has a 15-day guarantee!

Our order form is secured by
a
Volusion Security Certificate!
Talaria Enterprises
(800) 227-9196 / (909) 944-4994
Give Us a Call
9155 Archibald Ave., Racncho Cucamonga, CA USA
 Email us at: Help Desk
discover amex visa mastercard equifax securePay me securely with any major credit card through PayPal!

 If you have a specific product in mind which does not appear in these pages, please contact us through our Help Desk. We are always updating our product selection.

Copyright © 1997-2013 Talaria Enterprises No part of this catalog may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission. Prices subject to change without notice.